Tag Archives: British Parliament

What’s Next For The Fixed Term Parliaments Act?

The 56th Parliament of the United Kingdom came to an end yesterday after just two years. It was supposed to last until 2020, but the British will be going to the polls early after MPs backed Theresa May’s call for … Continue reading

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What’s Next For The Brexit Bill?

After 44 hours of debate, the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill finished its marathon journey through the House of Lords today. There was some last-minute drama as the Liberal Democrats mounted a quixotic effort to scupper the bill by blocking final … Continue reading

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Government Ditches Plans To Curb Lords’ Powers

In a move that should surprise no one, the Government has decided that it will not try to abolish the House of Lords’ veto over statutory instruments. While the Parliament Act 1911 removed the Lords’ veto over Acts of Parliament, it did not make … Continue reading

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Angelina Jolie And The House Of Lords

There have been reports in the media that Angelina Jolie fancies a seat in the House of Lords. But could that actually happen? Could she really become Baroness Jolie? The simple answer is yes. Although MPs must be British citizens … Continue reading

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Will Brexit Require An Act Of Parliament?

The UK Constitutional Law Association’s blog has a number of interesting posts about the constitutional aspects of Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union. Particularly noteworthy is a piece by Nick Barber, Tom Hickman, and Jeff King arguing that Britain might not be able to … Continue reading

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Could Parliament Ignore The Brexit Vote?

Last night, a friend of mine asked if I thought there was any chance that Parliament might ignore the result of the Brexit referendum. It’s an interesting question. From a constitutional standpoint, the referendum is simply advisory, and the Government … Continue reading

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Seven Candidates, Three Voters

The British constitution sometimes begets very strange things. On April 19, the Liberal Democrat hereditary peers held a by-election to fill the vacancy caused by Lord Avebury’s death. The result was an election where seven candidates competed for the votes of three people (ironically, the … Continue reading

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More Thoughts On The House Of Lords And Tax Credits

During the House of Lords’ debate on the Government’s tax credit cuts, Lord Mackay of Clashfern attempted to argue away peers’ role in approving regulations under the Tax Credits Act 2002. He claimed that this is essentially a matter of courtesy, and he drew an … Continue reading

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The House Of Lords And Statutory Instruments

I’ve been asked to explain how the House of Lords can reject the Government’s program of tax credit cuts when it hasn’t been able veto legislation since 1911. The answer lies in the distinction between primary and secondary legislation. The term ‘primary legislation’ … Continue reading

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The Government, The House Of Lords, And The Tax Credit Cuts

The Huffington Post UK recently claimed that the Government may ‘suspend’ the House of Lords if peers vote against George Osborne’s tax credit cuts next week. According to an anonymous Government insider, “one option is to simply suspend the Lords’ entire business, and … Continue reading

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