Tag Archives: royal prerogative

Government Loses Brexit Case

In a widely expected ruling, the Supreme Court ruled that the Government cannot trigger Article 50 without Parliament’s consent. I won’t go over the ruling in detail, as I’ve already discussed it here and here. Suffice it to say, I think the Supreme Court … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

How Can Theresa May Create New Departments So Quickly?

A reader was surprised to learn that Theresa May has made David Davis ‘Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union.’ They thought it was odd that she could create a new department out of thin air. This is possible because of the constitutional … Continue reading

Posted in British Constitution | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Why Didn’t David Cameron Step Down Immediately?

In the aftermath of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union, David Cameron has announced that he will step down as Prime Minister in October. This led a friend of mine to ask why he didn’t resign right away. The answer is that … Continue reading

Posted in British Constitution | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

A Curious Claim About Royal Assent

I came across a truly puzzling claim in David Rogers’ new book about the Privy Council: At perhaps the most mundane and perfunctory level, every time a Bill completes its passage through the Houses of Parliament…it cannot become law as an … Continue reading

Posted in British Constitution | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Curious Case Of Queen Victoria And The Lesbians

Today, I’m going to answer a question that I’ve been asked a surprising number of times: did Victoria prevent the criminalization of lesbianism because she didn’t believe that lesbians existed? According to the myth, the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885 … Continue reading

Posted in British Constitution | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Is The Fixed-Term Parliaments Act 2011 Fatally Flawed?

Writing in the Irish Times, Mark Hennessy has argued that the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 has a fatal constitutional flaw. Section 2(3) of the Act states that an early General Election may be held if the House of Commons passes … Continue reading

Posted in British Parliament | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

An Unfortunate Choice of Words

Yesterday, the Queen issued a royal proclamation summoning a new Parliament. The wording of the document has been substantially revised in light of the changes brought about by the Fixed-term Parliaments Act. Obviously, it no longer references dissolution, but there has … Continue reading

Posted in British Parliament | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Could Prince Charles Really Overhaul The Honors System?

Over the weekend, there were reports that the Prince of Wales wants to overhaul the honors system when he becomes king. In her forthcoming biography of the Prince, Time journalist Catherine Mayer claims that Prince Charles believes that honors are being awarded to the wrong … Continue reading

Posted in British Monarchy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Debunking “The Constitutional Monarchy Myth”

When people write about the Queen, she’s commonly described as a model constitutional monarch. While the Prince of Wales is frequently castigated for allegedly meddling in politics, most commentators assume that his mother is scrupulously neutral. But Backbench’s David Kelly has bucked that trend, arguing that the Queen … Continue reading

Posted in British Monarchy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Remembering the Whitlam Dismissal

Gough Whitlam died today at the age of 98. His death comes just a few weeks shy of the thirty-ninth anniversary of his dismissal at the hands of the Governor-General. This momentous event was one of the defining moments of Australian politics, … Continue reading

Posted in Australian Constitution | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments